Submit a Proposal for International Education Week Poster Session

The FCGS is now accepting proposals for posters during International Education Week (November 13 – 17). Posters will be presented during lunch on Tuesday November 14th. We invite students to submit a proposal to share their international experience — including experiences in the United States — to showcase research, internships, academic study, language acquisition, artistic endeavors, and independent work that has an international component. We hope this experience will allow students to connect with one another, to share their knowledge and experience and to grow personally, academically, and professionally through this experience.

The value of sharing what you know through a poster session can have a far-reaching impact. Because of the collaborative nature of this sessions and International Education Week, presenters often find that through the process of sharing their expertise they often gain new insights themselves. Being a presenter is also an excellent way to build your professional résumé and speaker profile. We hope you will consider participating and help fulfill our mission to support students in expanding international opportunities and experiences by sharing what you know with others.

TO SUBMIT PROPOSAL, PLEASE CLICK HERE

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 2017 AT 11:59 PM EST.

Apply for a Writing Mentor

Writing can be scary, but let us help you start the new year out strong! Apply for a Writing Mentor! A Writing Mentor will meet with you privately each week to help you with writing in all of your classes. Mentors are trained to help you at all stages of the writing process, whether it be brainstorming, structure, grammar, style, or time management. By having a mentor, you will be able to continuously improve your writing throughout the semester. Start out strong, and end even stronger!

We work with students of all writing abilities and in all disciplines, and all services are, of course, free.

Please apply here, by Monday, September 18th at 8:00 AM. We will notify new mentees by the 20th.

We look forward to working with you!

Resilience Retreat 2017

Are you yearning to feel more grounded, capable, and confident?  We invite you to participate in an off-campus, all-expense paid, interfaith weekend retreat from October 6-8 to help you enjoy increased resiliency by discovering and cultivating your own inner strength and peace.  During this program, we will discuss key components of resilience, identify individual areas of strength and potential growth, learn specific tools and practices that can help us become more resilient, and reflect on the role of our faith/spirituality.  Space is limited!  For more information, please contact Rev. Tracy Mehr-Muska from the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life at tmehrmuska@wesleyan.edu.  To register, please fill out this form prior to 5pm on September 15https://goo.gl/forms/dQ7ERXw6CUjXhPzC3.

2017 Wes in the World Photo Contest

The Fries Center for Global Studies is excited to announce its annual Wes in the World Photo Contest! This contest offers students who have studied or live abroad to share their experiences with our community. We invite anyone who falls within this group to submit photographs that you feel best represent your experiences abroad. In doing so, you will support the Fries Center for Global Studies in our efforts to recognize and celebrate cultural diversity.

Here is how you can participate.

You can find the contest rules, submission guidelines, and upload your photos on this website: http://bit.ly/2whqxB2  

This year we have 5 categories for photo submission, as displayed below:

  • People: Single pictures portraying individual or groups of people.
  • Nature and Architecture: Single pictures of flora, fauna, structures, or landscapes.
  • Daily Life: Single pictures documenting either the ordinary or extraordinary elements in everyday life not normally considered news.
  • Contemporary Issues: Single pictures documenting cultural, economic, environmental, political, or social issues.
  • Sports: Single pictures that capture individual or team sports.

Entry Deadline: September 30, 2017

Prizes will be awarded to the winners in each category at a special event, to be hosted in the Fries Center for Global Studies during International Education Week (November 13-17).

If you have any questions about the photo contest, please email Kia Lor (klor@wesleyan.edu).

Usdan Center 10th Anniversary

Mark your calendar for September 7, 11am – 3pm, for the Usdan University Center’s 1oth Anniversary celebrating the Center and Student Life.  This is the perfect opportunity to learn more about this amazing building by informing yourself about the rooms and services it can provide you throughout the year.  Review a display of the history of campus centers at Wesleyan – Downey House (1936), The Davenport Campus Center (1984), and now Usdan (2007).  Have a piece of Anniversary cake, and earn a chance to spin the prize wheel throughout the afternoon.  Listen to music from 2007 in the dining bay.  This is a must do event for your first week back on campus, and a great break from chasing classes.

Audition for Fall Faculty Production: The Pillowman

Our production this fall is The Pillowman by Martin McDonagh. Here is a note from the director, Visiting Professor-of-Practice Eddie Torres:

“In a world of violence, mistrust and apathy, the state of justice is struggling to survive in the wake of the Pillowman. Come out and take a stand…. AUDITION!”

A brief comment about the play from http://stageagent.com/shows/play/1434/the-pillowman:
“This brutal dark comedy from Martin McDonagh, the master of the horror-comedy, poses unanswerable questions: Can stories hold the power to cause atrocities? Where is the line between truth and fairy tale? Is a life of horror worth living at all? Drawing on inspiration as diverse as Grimm’s Fairy Tales, Kafka, and Antonin Artaud, The Pillowman is a dark, twisty, and utterly unforgettable masterpiece from one of Ireland’s most treasured writers.”

All students are encouraged to audition, no matter of experience or academic focus. We would like to have as diverse a pool of talent as possible from throughout the Wesleyan student community.

Space Available in Introduction to Experimental Music (MUSC 109)

Introduction to Experimental Music (MUSC 109)

Fall 2017; Tuesdays & Thursdays, 2:50 p.m. – 4:10 p.m., RHH 003

This course is a survey of recent and historical electronic and instrumental experimental works, with emphasis on the works of American composers. Starting with early experimentalists, germinal works of John Cage and Henry Cowell, Earle Brown, Christian Wolff, and Morton Feldman will be studied; followed by electronic and minimal works of La Monte Young, Terry Riley, David Behrman, Gordon Mumma, Alvin Lucier Robert Ashley, Steve Reich, Philip Glass, Meredith Monk, Laurie Anderson, Arthur Russell, John Zorn, Julius Eastman and including discussions of recent work by composers, performers, and sound artists such as Pamela Z, Tristan Perich, Jacob Cooper, Lesley Flanigan,  Nick Hallett, Jace Clayton (DJ /rupture), Jennifer Walshe, and Object Collection. The course includes lectures, demonstrations, and performances, occasionally by guest lecturers.

Volunteering Opportunities in Middletown Involving Language Acquisition

Volunteer with ESL (English as a Second Language) children in the Middletown Public School System

Provide academic instruction and support to children at Woodrow Wilson Middle School as they continue to hone their English language skills.  Help with day to day assignments and classroom activities

  • Knowledge of Spanish / Arabic preferred, but not required
  • Minimum commitment: ~2 hours per week, between 8:30 am and 2:30 pm (WWMS school hours), preferably over the whole 2017-2018 academic year

Informational meeting: Have pizza with the middle schoolers you’ll be assisting!
Friday Sept. 15, 12:00 – 1:00 pm
Highwaymen Common Room
Dept. Romance Languages & Literatures (300 High St)

For further information, please contact Phoebe Howe (phhowe@wesleyan.edu)

Teach elementary Spanish / French to Middletown children (ages 4-7) at the Russell Library (“Speak like Babar” / “Speak like Dora”)

  • Limited to 4 volunteers who will be enrolled in a French/Spanish class 221 or above (2 French/2 Spanish)
  • Commitment: 1 hour on Saturday (12-2 pm, October and November), plus several sessions to prepare lessons

Informational meeting
Friday Sept. 8, 12:00 – 1:00 pm
127 Downey House

For further information, please contact Prof. Ana Pérez-Gironés (aperezgirone@wesleyan.edu )

Take the Winter Session/Summer Session Course Survey

Take the Winter Session/Summer Session Course Survey!

Student feedback is the most important tool we have to build the winter session and summer session curricula. Take the course survey before Friday (9/1) and you’ll be entered in a raffle to win a prize from RJ Julia! If you have any questions or would like to offer additional feedback about winter session or summer session courses, contact winter@wesleyan.edu or call 860-685-2005.

New Course: Performing the Posthuman: Music and Auditory Culture in the Age of Animanities

MUSC287 — Performing the Posthuman: Music and Auditory Culture in the Age of Animanities

Crosslisting: AMST 278, ENVS 287
Course Cluster: Animal Studies

This seminar engages questions of musical difference by addressing representations, tropes, and examples of posthuman performance, animal musicalities, music mimetic of nonhuman aurality, and cross-species and multi-species performance. Throughout the course we will think across varied types and categories of sounds to explore and contextualize familiar questions about how we sing, play, perform, stage, and sound musical identity, examining the intersections among the humanities, science and technology studies, and the sonic arts. “Animanities” is the name attributed by scholars to the musical response to the dilemma facing the humanities to value, take into account, and take seriously the aural and performance worlds of the nonhuman. It is necessary to include all human, more-than-human, sentient and non-sentient, machine, and animal sounding and musicking into the fields of musicology, ethnomusicology, and sound studies. By listening across different kinds of auditory culture and sounding, scholars can interrogate questions addressing how traditions of listening shape our habits of perceiving others: how we hear nonhuman animals, how we incorporate nonhuman sounding into music composed by humans, how technology has played a role in the study and development of nonhuman and human musicality, and what it means to listen to and value sonic difference more broadly. Through discussions of musical and cultural difference that enrich ongoing discussions of race, gender, and sexuality we will come to a stronger understanding of music’s role in imagined and experienced natural worlds. Topics and case studies will include the pedagogies of audio bird guides; new age nature recordings, multi-species “collaborative” performances; sampled and electronically rendered animal and nature performance in digital video games; wildlife field recording and documentary soundtracks/sound design; forms of animal and environmental mimesis used by composers; the jazz aviary of exotic songbirds and chirping canaries in the publications and reception history of the 1930s–1960s that document female jazz singers and virtuosic operatic sopranos; they way nonhuman animal behavior influenced experimental music communities; and how human musical language and terminology was used to describe the musicking of nonhuman animals in documents circulated by the National Audubon Society and other wildlife guides and field recording initiatives. This seminar draws on the classroom community’s interdisciplinary backgrounds and interests as well as readings and case studies that cross and challenge disciplinary boundaries. Students can achieve success in this course without previous musical knowledge.