Apply for a Writing Mentor

Have you ever wanted a personal editor? Someone who would meet with you privately to help you with your writing?

Your Writing Mentor will work with you on your particular writing concerns, whether you need help generating ideas, structuring your essay, improving sentence clarity and grammar, or managing your time.  As mentors and mentees meet on a weekly basis, this program is designed for students who enjoy regular collaboration.  If you participate, you will have a sophomore, junior, or senior assigned to meet with you throughout the semester.

We work with students of all writing abilities and in all disciplines.  All services are free.

To apply for a writing mentor for the Spring 2017 semester, please fill out the online application here by Friday, February 10th at 11:59PM; we will let you know by  Wednesday, February 15th, if we’ve been able to pair you with a mentor. Please contact Ford Fellow Gabe Borelli at writingworks@wesleyan.edu or 860-685-2440 if you have any questions or concerns.

We look forward to working with you.

Apply for a Writing Mentor

Mentor program poster fall 2016Writing Mentors will work with you one-on-one on all aspects of writing, from structure to grammar to time management.  Your mentor will meet with on on a weekly basis throughout the semester.  Open to students of all writing abilities in all disciplines.  All services are free.

Deadline to apply: Monday September 19 at 8:00am.

http://www.wesleyan.edu/writing/workshop/applymentor.html

For information, contact the Writing Programs: writingworks@wesleyan.edu

First Year Seminars

First-year seminars are writing intensive courses that introduce students to a variety of topics ranging from Greek myth to neuroscience. Some treat a specific thinker (e.g., Kafka); others provide a sweeping introduction into an interdisciplinary area of study that may be new to first-year students (e.g., animal studies). All of these seminars, however, emphasize the importance of writing at the university level. Students in first-year seminars become familiar with the methods used to collect, interpret, analyze, and present evidence as part of a scholarly argument. Faculty teaching these classes also highlight the type of writing associated with their respective disciplines, and help students develop, compose, organize, and revise their writing. All first-year seminars have assignments totaling at least 20 pages, and feature oral or written feedback on student writing; many also employ peer-mentoring and writing tutors. First-year seminars are limited to 15 students.  Click here for a complete list.