Call for Submissions of Art/Performance on Disruption/Disaster

The College of the Environment Think Tank is inviting proposals for creative work on the theme of “Disaster” and the ways in which humans confront or survive disasters, to be shared with the public on Friday, March 2, 2018 in the Memorial Chapel as part of an event hosted by the COE Think Tank.

Below is the description of the themes we are working with.  Proposals can be submitted for the creation of new work, or for existing work.

We are able to offer $200 honoraria. In addition to sharing the work at the March 2 event, we will ask you to talk about your project in 8-10 minute presentation with time for audience to respond and ask questions.

Proposals are due by Thursday, February 1, midnight.

Submit to: Katja Kolcio – Kkolcio@wesleyan.edu

Selection will be determined by Tuesday, February 6. Work must be completed by Monday, February 26 and the event will take place Friday, March 2, afternoon-evening.

Please include:

Your full name
Wesleyan University Email Address
Your Wesleyan University P.O Box # (for payment purposes only)
Your Wesleyan University ID # (for payment purposes only)
Your class year and major(s) if you have declared.
Are you an international student? (for payment purposes only)
A 300 word (maximum) description of the work. A sample of the work or other relevant work if such exists.
A description of the format and technical requirements (Performance? Exhibit? Video? Music? Etc?)

THEME: FROM DISRUPTIONS TO DISASTERS: A LENS ON THE HUMAN-ENVIRONMENT RELATIONSHIP

Since its inception, the Earth has had a violent history of disruption and disasters.  Volcanic eruptions, transformations of the atmosphere, meteoritic collisions, mass extinctions, moving glaciers, plagues, disease, wars, politics and belief systems are but some of the perturbations, natural and otherwise, that disrupt the dynamic processes of the earth and all life that has lived on it. Natural and anthropogenic perturbations across a range of scales set the Earth, ecosystems and human communities onto different courses.  While disruptions and disasters have been an integral part of the history and evolution of the planet, the relationship between humans and their environment continues to evolve as perturbations shift in frequency, magnitude and type.  These perturbations arise from both non-anthropogenic  and anthropogenic  sources.  But there is also a growing human-environment interaction that leads to disruptions and disasters at a variety of scales.  While some of the anthropogenic factors depend upon technological advances (e.g., nuclear radiation) other factors are ancient (e.g., the use of fire to clear large areas for agricultural purposes, such as in Ukraine, Indonesia or South America).

Our current world offers a series of profound challenges to humanity.  We are pushing our world towards a tipping point of climate change by our changes to the carbon cycle and use of fossil fuels. The social-political-ethnic-religious theater of rivalries and conflict intensifies as the environmental stage rotates. The biochemical machinery of humans and the biological world is now constantly challenged by exposure to a bewildering array of microbes, chemical, and other disturbance agents—to which, humans and other Earth inhabitants must continually adapt. In all of this, the human-environment relationship is cyclical. Both parts of the relationship manifest change in the other setting up an ever changing dynamic.

The 2017-2018 College of the Environment Think Tank will focus upon how humanity will confront and take measure of the human-environment relationship from diverse perspectives of biochemistry, ecology, socio-political-religious, somatics, art, and embodiment.

Thank you,

2017-18 Think Tank Members

Katja Kolcio, Chair and Professor of Dance
Ishita Mukerji, Professor of Integrative Science and Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Marguerite Nguyen, Assistant Professor of English and East Asian Studies
Eiko Otake, Menakka and Essel Bailey ’66 Distinguished Visiting Scholar in the College of the Environment
Helen Poulos, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Environment Studies

An Introduction to Study Abroad and Fellowships for First Years and Sophomores

Please join us for an event tomorrow celebrating International Education Week! This is part of a rich agenda of week-long activities.

An Introduction to Study Abroad and Fellowships for First Years and Sophomores

This event is specifically aimed at First Year and Sophomore students. Are you thinking about studying abroad during the 2018-2019 school year? Come along and find out what study abroad is all about! Study abroad staff will be happy to answer all your questions!

This event takes place on Wednesday, November 15th at 12:15 pm in the Fries Center for Global Studies Commons. Lunch will be provided

Hosted by Class Deans and Fries Center for Global Studies | Fries Center for Global Studies Commons

Friends of the Wesleyan Library Undergraduate Research Prize

The Friends of the Wesleyan Library are happy to announce the launch of an undergraduate research prize. The research project, widely conceived, can be from any undergraduate course taken in Spring 2016, Summer 2016, Fall 2016, or Winter 2017 from currently enrolled Wesleyan students. Honors theses are not eligible.

Projects will be evaluated based on the use of Wesleyan’s library collections and resources as well as on the quality of writing and research. We are particularly interested in receiving applications that show evidence of learning about research techniques and the information-gathering process itself.

There will be two cash awards: a 1st place prize worth $500 and a 2nd place prize worth $250.

Instructors and librarians are encouraged to nominate students’ work; students may also self-nominate. Please send nominations to: libfriends@wesleyan.edu.

All materials must be submitted electronically, preferably as PDF files. Applications will include:

The jury will be comprised of members of the Friends of Wesleyan Library board, Wesleyan librarians, and Wesleyan faculty from Arts & Humanities, Social & Behavioral Sciences, and Natural Sciences & Mathematics.

Deadline: 5pm, March 10, 2017.

Awards will be announced in April 2017.

For inquiries, contact the Friends of Wesleyan Library, at libfriends@wesleyan.edu.

College of the Environment Announces 2017 Summer and Fall Internships

UnknownThe College of the Environment announces 2017 summer and fall internships. This year, we are using an online application process that can be accessed from our website – www.wesleyan.edu/coe under the column labeled COE INTERNSHIPS. Please read the memorandum from Director Barry Chernoff for the details. (http://www.wesleyan.edu/coe/internships/index.html). The summer internship will run from May 31, 2017 – August 3, 2017 with a stipend payment of $4,000. The deadline for the application and two letters of recommendations are due on or before Monday, February 27, 2017, 5pm.

Summer Opportunity: Doris Duke Conservation Scholars Program at the University of Washington

The Doris Duke Conservation Scholars Program at The University of Washington (DDCSP@UW) is now accepting applications for the 2017-2018 cohort!

If you questions about the program, please feel free to reach out to Olivia Won (owon@wesleyan.edu), Kai Blatt (kblatt@wesleyan.edu), or Joseph Eusebio (jeusebio@wesleyan.edu). 

About the Program

DDCSP@UW is a paid, multi-summer, undergraduate experiential learning program that explores conservation across climate, water, food and ecosystems of the Pacific Northwest.

A primary goal of the program is to expand what it means to be a “conservation professional.” By connecting conservation to cultural identity, biodiversity and environmental justice DDCSP@UW supports emerging scholars as they develop understandings, skills and perspectives needed to become a conservation change-maker.  What does this mean? Watch this video!

The first year experience begins in Seattle and travels through various cultural and ecological landscapes in Washington, from the Olympic Peninsula to the Salish Sea and across the Cascade Mountains into the Yakima Valley, learning about emerging and ongoing issues in conservation along the way. Read more about the first year “Classroom in the Field” here.

**Doris Duke Conservation Scholars will have all travel, food and lodging paid during their 8-week summer experience and will receive a stipend of $4,000 ($500/week).

Who can apply?

We’re looking for 20 freshmen and sophomores to join us for an 8-week conservation immersion course. 

Scholars can be from any and all majors (including “undecided”). In fact, we’re specifically looking for a broad mix of students with varying interests, skills and perspectives who demonstrate a commitment to the environment, equity and inclusion and are curious, creative and enthusiastic. Eligible applicants must be U.S. citizen, permanent resident or have DACA status granted by the U.S. Citizenship & Immigration Services.  (For more on DACA, refer to this link). 

** DDCSP@UW seeks to form and support a community of scholars who are representative of various cross-cultural backgrounds and perspectives that span across class, race, religion, ethnicity, sexual identity, sexual orientation and physical ability.

Learn more and APPLY here!

Timeline:

Application opens: November 14, 2016
Application deadline: January 31, 2017
Notified: Early March
Program begins: June 19, 2017 (Travel day June 18)
Program ends: August 11, 2017 (Travel August 12)