The Peter Morgenstern-Clarren ’03 Social JusticeAward

The Peter Morgenstern-Clarren ’03 Social JusticeAward was created in memory of Peter Morgenstern-Clarren who pursued social justice while a student at Wesleyan.  His activism included securing benefits for Wesleyan custodial staff, participating in the United Student and Labor Action Committee, and contributing his leadership to the campus chapter of Amnesty International.  We are grateful to Dr. Hadley Morgenstern-Clarren and The Honorable Pat Morgenstern-Clarren for their generosity in sponsoring this award that honors their son’s activism for the public good.  A committee will select the sophomore or junior who best embodies the pursuit of social justice. The winner will receive a cash award of $1,500.  The application process is described below. Any sophomore or junior in good standing may submit an essay that addresses the following:

Describe in detail the most influential social justice effort in which you played a leadership role that sought to make our local and global communities more equitable (The effort should have a direct effect on the Wesleyan campus and/or on external communities.)

  1. Explain your level of involvement in the work for example: your role in raising awareness about a particular issue on campus, coordinating events, implementing programming and campaigns in the pursuit of social justice.
  2. n addition to your essay, you must include a letter of support from a faculty or administrator involved in your effort and submit evidence of impact that the social justice effort had on making our society more just by contributing testimonies from individuals (excluding family and friends) directly involved, artifacts from your social justice effort (e.g., past printed programs, presentations, and articles), and/or your work from courses. You may include non-print items, such as DVDs.

You must submit all items electronically to Dean Teshia Levy-Grant (tlevygrant@wesleyan.edu), North College, 1st floor, Room 122 by 5 p.m. Friday, April 12th, 2019.  All essays, letters of support and printed items must be in by the deadline.  By submitting your packet, you agree to allow the Office of Equity & Inclusion to use it (or excerpts from it) for assessment, archival, and promotion purposes. If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to contact Dean Teshia Levy-Grant.

Be The Change Venture Pitch Competition

Join Be the Change Venture 509(a)(2) and Kai Wes on Thursday, April 25, 2019, from 6-8 p.m. for a pitch competition at Wesleyan RJ Julia Bookstore. This opportunity is open to high school students and college undergraduates. A $500 -college and $200- high school seed grant will be given to the best pitch competitors. The deadline to apply is Friday, April 12, 2019 at 11:59 p.m.Submit an application and or register here.

Shu Tokita Prize For Students of Color Studying Literature

The Shu Tokita Prize, established by friends and relatives of Shu Tokita, ’84, will be awarded to a student of color majoring in literature, in area studies, or a language major with a focus on literature, who demonstrate need for substantial financial assistance. If you have any questions about whether or not you are eligible, please contact us.  Recipients will be selected on the basis of commitment to the study of literature as evidenced in the content and quality of their essays, and financial need. Awarded to one or two sophomores and/or juniors for the remainder of their time at Wesleyan, the Prize is usually $1,500 per year. The recipient(s) of the Shu Tokita Prize will receive the annual award at the start of the following fall semester, that is, for their junior and/or senior year(s).

The Prize was established in memory of Shu Tokita, Class of 1984, who passed away in January of 1989 from leukemia. He had received a B. A. in English Literature from Wesleyan University and an M. A. in Japanese Literature from Tsukuba University. He studied literature as a pursuit that spoke to his life, and from which he gained insights and, ultimately, strength. The Prize seeks to reflect Shu’s interest in literature and his belief that it should be accessible to people of all backgrounds; thus, the Prize is focused on supporting students of color, for whom the study of literature, Shu’s family and friends felt, is often considered a “luxury.” Through the Prize, we hope to encourage and assist Shu Tokita recipients in their decision to pursue literature as an academic endeavor. We hope that they will likewise share their insights and wisdom with their communities. Current Wesleyan student winners of the Shu Tokita Prize are Kalee Kennedy ‘19 and  Brynn Assignon ‘20.

ELIGIBILITY:

  1. Any domestic student of color (U.S. citizen, permanent resident, or undocumented student) who is a full-time Wesleyan sophomore or junior and is African American, Asian/Pacific American, Latino/a American, or Native American, is eligible to apply. The applicant must be in need of substantial financial aid.
  2. The applicant’s major or focus of study must be in literature. Applicants may be affiliated with the following departments: English, College of Letters, other language/literature departments, or area studies, e. g., East Asian Studies concentrating on Chinese or Japanese literature.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

The selection is based on the submitted 750-word essay on one of the two topics identified in the application form, and on financial need, and not on academic standing.

SELECTION: Selection is based on review of applicant’s written essay and financial need.

DEADLINE for submission of applications: 5 p.m., Wednesday, April 17.

ANNOUNCEMENT OF PRIZE WINNER: In time for the prize reception in May.

TO APPLY: Prize application form is attached. For further information, please contact the campus coordinator of the Shu Tokita Prize committee, Alice Hadler (Downey House 209, x 2832, ahadler@wesleyan.edu, campus mail: English Dept., 294 High St.). Please submit your application and essay as an email attachment to Prof. Hadler by the Wednesday April 17 deadline.

THE SHU TOKITA MEMORIAL PRIZE APPLICATION FORM

Name: _____________________________________ Class: _________________________

Campus Box #: ____________________________ Telephone: _____________________

WesID#: __________________________ E-Mail: _________________________

Home Address: _____________________________ Home Telephone: _______________

______________________________

Major: ________________________________________________________________________

Program with a focus on literature: _________________________________________________

Please check:

__________ I am a domestic student of color currently enrolled full-time at Wesleyan.

Please also check:

_____ I hereby give permission to the members of the Shu Tokita Memorial Prize Committee to share among themselves information concerning my Financial Aid status for the purpose of evaluating my application. I understand that the Committee members are Prof Emerita Yoshiko Samuel, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Teiji Kawana, ’84, Daphne Kwok, ’84, Alice Hadler, English Department and Dean’s Office, Renee Johnson-Thornton, Dean for the Class of 2018, Amy Tang, English Dept., Marguerite Nguyen, English Dept.  Current prizewinners may also be asked to read application essays, but will not see other application information.

Please include a 750- word essay on one of the two topics below with your application:

  1. How do you plan to use your major, or focus of study, to make literature more accessible to people of all backgrounds? Please offer a specific example from either your own experience or perhaps a literary text that can illustrate your views.
  1. What is your response to someone who asserts that a major in literature is “impractical?” Please offer a specific example from either your own experience or perhaps a literary text that can illustrate your views.

Applications should be submitted by email by April 17, 2019 to:

The Shu Tokita Memorial Prize Committee
ahadler@wesleyan.edu

Fulbright Grants: A Year Abroad After Graduation

Do you want to travel overseas after graduating from Wesleyan? Fulbright grants provide full funding for a year of research, graduate study, or English teaching in a foreign country.

With over 2,000 awards each year and no minimum GPA requirement, the Fulbright U.S. Student Program is the largest and most inclusive national fellowship program.

Come to learn more and hear about Study Abroad Advisor Michael Acosta’s recent Fulbright experience!

Tuesday, April 2, 12 noon
Fisk Commons
Lunch from Thai Gardens will be served!
https://www.facebook.com/events/334016627469300/

Contact: Dr. Magdalena Zapędowska, Assistant Director of Fellowships, Fries Center for Global Studies
mzapedowska@wesleyan.edu

Center for the Humanities Open House and Student Fellowship Information Session 3/6

All members of the junior class are invited to an Open House in the Lounge at the Center for the Humanities (95 Pearl Street) on Wednesday, March 6th (11:50-1pm) to learn more about the Center and its Student Fellowship Program.  Come meet our current Student Fellows and learn about their projects and experiences at the Center while enjoying a delicious lunch!

A total of eight Student Fellowships are awarded each year by the Center’s Advisory Board (four Student Fellows for each semester).  Student Fellows share an office at the Center and take part in Center events and activities. Among these events are the Center’s Monday Night Lecture series; colloquia discussions on Tuesdays, 10:30-1:00; and occasional Center conferences. One course credit is awarded for the Student Fellow’s participation in the Center’s activities.

Applicants for a Student Fellowship must be planning to do a senior project (usually an Honors Thesis) on a topic relating to the Center theme for the semester or year.  The 2019-2020 theme is:  “ Revolutions: Material Forms, Mobile Futures.”  The project need not be underway at the time of the application. Student Fellows have the opportunity to work closely with Faculty Fellows, Post-Doctoral Fellows, and Visiting Research Fellows in residence at the Center. The Center also provides up to $500 in travel funding to Student Fellows for travel to archives, libraries, museums, conferences, performances and other sites necessary to the completion of their senior projects.

Applications for student fellowships are due by 4pm on Thursday, March 28th, 2019.  Applicants will be informed of the Center Advisory Board’s decision by Friday, April 12th, 2019.

If you have any questions, please email Erinn Savage at esavage@wesleyan.edu.

For further information, see: http://wesleyan.edu/humanities/fellowships/students.html

 

National Fellowships for Juniors

National Fellowships for Juniors
Tuesday, February 12, 12:00 Noon in Fisk Commons

Are you thinking of applying for a national fellowship in the future? Are you interested but unsure what fellowships are and how to get started? Come learn what opportunities are out there and which might be a good fit for you. Remember that we support you throughout the application process, from initial exploration through brainstorming, drafting, and revising your materials. Mondo pizza will be served.

Looking for Funding for your Unpaid or Low-paid Summer Experience?

The 2019 Wesleyan Summer Grants Program will be accepting applications from January 28th – February 28th, 11:59pm.

Wesleyan Summer Grants are funding resources awarded through the Gordon Career Center which allow students to pursue no- or low-paid career-related summer experiences. Experiential learning opportunities can be both in the U.S. and abroad and include career-related opportunities such as internships, faculty-mentored research, language study, volunteer work, field study, and academic programs.

The Gordon Career Center will be holding four information sessions which will cover funding opportunities, eligibility and requirements, navigating the application process, and what makes a strong application. All sessions will conclude with a Q&A.
01.29 – WSG Information Session, 12:00pm, Career Center
02.01 – WSG Information Session, 12:15pm, Career Center
02.07 – WSG Information Session, 12:00pm, Career Center
02.11 – WSG Information Session, 12:15pm, Career Center

The list of available grants and the application can be accessed on AcademicWorks through WesPortal. For more information about the application process, please visit the Gordon Career Center website.

Don’t know where to begin or need help with your application? Schedule an appointment to meet with a career advisor.

McNair Program Recruiting STEM Majors

Eligibility Requirements

  • 2nd and 3rd-Year STEM majors who are interested in pursuing a PhD
  • US citizen or Permanent Resident
  • First-generation to attend college & low income and/or
  • Groups underrepresented in STEM fields (Hispanic/Latino, American Indian or Alaska Native, African American, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander; females not considered underrepresented)

Apply at: http://www.wesleyan.edu/mcnair
Application review begins Friday, November 16.

McNair Program Information Session for STEM Students 10/16

Info Session Tuesday, October 16, 6-7pm, Usdan 110

Eligibility Requirements

  • 2nd and 3rd-Year STEM majors who are interested in pursuing a PhD
  • US citizen or Permanent Resident
  • First-generation to attend college & low income and/or
  • Groups underrepresented in STEM fields (Hispanic/Latino, American Indian or Alaska Native, African American, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander; females not considered underrepresented)

Shu Tokita Prize for Students of Color Studying Literature

The Shu Tokita Prize, established by friends and relatives of Shu Tokita, ’84, will be awarded to one or two students of color majoring in literature, in area studies, or a language major with a focus on literature, who demonstrate need for substantial financial assistance. If you have any questions about whether or not you are eligible, please contact us.  Recipients will be selected on the basis of commitment to the study of literature as evidenced in the content and quality of their essays, and financial need. Awarded to one or two sophomores and/or juniors for the remainder of their time at Wesleyan, the Prize is usually $1,500 per year. The recipient(s) of the Shu Tokita Prize will receive the annual award at the start of the following fall semester, that is, for their junior and/or senior year(s).

The Prize was established in memory of Shu Tokita, Class of 1984, who passed away in January of 1989 from leukemia. He had received a B. A. in English Literature from Wesleyan University and an M. A. in Japanese Literature from Tsukuba University. He studied literature as a pursuit that spoke to his life, and from which he gained insights and, ultimately, strength. The Prize seeks to reflect Shu’s interest in literature and his belief that it should be accessible to people of all backgrounds; thus, the Prize is focused on supporting students of color, for whom the study of literature, Shu’s family and friends felt, is often considered a “luxury.” Through the Prize, we hope to encourage and assist Shu Tokita recipients in their decision to pursue literature as an academic endeavor. We hope that they will likewise share their insights and wisdom with their communities.

ELIGIBILITY:

  1. Any domestic student of color (U.S. citizen, permanent resident, or undocumented student) who is a full-time Wesleyan sophomore or junior and is African American, Asian/Pacific American, Latino/a American, or Native American, is eligible to apply. The applicant must be in need of substantial financial aid.
  2. The applicant’s major or focus of study must be in literature. Applicants may be affiliated with the following departments: English, College of Letters, other language/literature departments, or area studies, e. g., East Asian Studies concentrating on Chinese or Japanese literature.

SELECTION CRITERIA:

The selection is based on the submitted 750-word essay on one of the two topics below, and on financial need, and not on academic standing.

Essay topics:

  1. How do you plan to use your major, or focus of study, to make literature more

accessible to people of all backgrounds?  Please offer a specific example from either your own experience or perhaps a literary text that can illustrate your views.

  1. What is your response to someone who asserts that a major in literature is “impractical?” Please offer a specific example from either your own experience or perhaps a literary text that can illustrate your views.

SELECTION: Selection is based on review of applicant’s written essay and financial need.

DEADLINE for submission of applications: 5 p.m., Monday, April 16.

ANNOUNCEMENT OF PRIZE WINNER: In time for the prize reception in May.

TO APPLY: Prize application form is attached. For further information, please contact the campus coordinator of the Shu Tokita Prize committee, Alice Hadler (Downey House 209, x 2832, ahadler@wesleyan.edu, campus mail: English Dept., 294 High St.). Please submit your application and essay as an email attachment to Prof. Hadler by the Monday April 16 deadline.

 

THE SHU TOKITA MEMORIAL PRIZE APPLICATION FORM

Name: _____________________________________ Class: _________________________

Campus Box #: ____________________________ Telephone: _____________________

WesID#: __________________________ E-Mail: _________________________

Home Address: _____________________________ Home Telephone: _______________

______________________________

Major: ________________________________________________________________________

Program with a focus on literature: _________________________________________________

Please check:

__________ I am a domestic student of color currently enrolled full-time at Wesleyan.

Please also check:

_____ I hereby give permission to the members of the Shu Tokita Memorial Prize Committee to

share among themselves information concerning my Financial Aid status for the purpose of

evaluating my application. I understand that the Committee members are Prof Emerita Yoshiko Samuel, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Teiji Kawana, ’84, Daphne Kwok, ’84, Alice Hadler, English Department and Dean’s Office, Renee Johnson-Thornton, Dean for the Class of 2018, Amy Tang, English Dept., Marguerite Nguyen, English Dept.  Current prizewinners may also be asked to read application essays, but will not see other application information.

Please include a 750- word essay on one of the two topics below with your application:

  1. How do you plan to use your major, or focus of study, to make literature more accessible to people of all backgrounds? Please offer a specific example from either your own experience or perhaps a literary text that can illustrate your views.
  1. What is your response to someone who asserts that a major in literature is “impractical?” Please offer a specific example from either your own experience or perhaps a literary text that can illustrate your views.

 Applications should be submitted by email by April 16, 2018 to:

The Shu Tokita Memorial Prize Committee

ahadler@wesleyan.edu

Apply for the Wesleyan Black Alumni Council Prize

In April 1986, the Wesleyan Black Alumni Council (WBAC) established a memorial fund to honor deceased alumni of African descent. The memorial honors the memory and spirit of Bruce D. Hall ’77, James “Donnie” Rochester ’74, and Dwight L. Greene ’70. In its wisdom, the Council agreed that the most fitting honor of the spirit of deceased alumni was through a scholarship/summer experience grant to enrich and expand the education of students from underrepresented groups, or students interested in research pertaining to the African-American experience. The maximum stipend is $4,000. 

Application: A student who wishes to apply for the Wesleyan Black Alumni Council Memorial Prize must submit a proposal that includes all of the following: 

  1. A personal statement that includes a discussion of the applicant’s intellectual and academic interests and their relationship to the African American experience. 
  2. A description of the research plan that discusses the nature, scope and methodology that will be used to explore the problem/thesis/project. 
  3. An itemized budget that describes how the stipend will be used. 
  4. An unofficial academic history. 

The application must be submitted as an email attachment (.doc, .docx, or .pdf format) by 11:59 p.m. on Thursday, April 12, 2018, to Dean Teshia Levy-Grant (tlevygrant@wesleyan.edu). Potential applicants for the WBAC Memorial Prize are strongly encouraged to make an appointment to meet with Dean Levy-Grant to discuss their proposal ideas: 122 North College 860.685.2272 

Call for Submissions of Art/Performance on Disruption/Disaster

The College of the Environment Think Tank is inviting proposals for creative work on the theme of “Disaster” and the ways in which humans confront or survive disasters, to be shared with the public on Friday, March 2, 2018 in the Memorial Chapel as part of an event hosted by the COE Think Tank.

Below is the description of the themes we are working with.  Proposals can be submitted for the creation of new work, or for existing work.

We are able to offer $200 honoraria. In addition to sharing the work at the March 2 event, we will ask you to talk about your project in 8-10 minute presentation with time for audience to respond and ask questions.

Proposals are due by Thursday, February 1, midnight.

Submit to: Katja Kolcio – Kkolcio@wesleyan.edu

Selection will be determined by Tuesday, February 6. Work must be completed by Monday, February 26 and the event will take place Friday, March 2, afternoon-evening.

Please include:

Your full name
Wesleyan University Email Address
Your Wesleyan University P.O Box # (for payment purposes only)
Your Wesleyan University ID # (for payment purposes only)
Your class year and major(s) if you have declared.
Are you an international student? (for payment purposes only)
A 300 word (maximum) description of the work. A sample of the work or other relevant work if such exists.
A description of the format and technical requirements (Performance? Exhibit? Video? Music? Etc?)

THEME: FROM DISRUPTIONS TO DISASTERS: A LENS ON THE HUMAN-ENVIRONMENT RELATIONSHIP

Since its inception, the Earth has had a violent history of disruption and disasters.  Volcanic eruptions, transformations of the atmosphere, meteoritic collisions, mass extinctions, moving glaciers, plagues, disease, wars, politics and belief systems are but some of the perturbations, natural and otherwise, that disrupt the dynamic processes of the earth and all life that has lived on it. Natural and anthropogenic perturbations across a range of scales set the Earth, ecosystems and human communities onto different courses.  While disruptions and disasters have been an integral part of the history and evolution of the planet, the relationship between humans and their environment continues to evolve as perturbations shift in frequency, magnitude and type.  These perturbations arise from both non-anthropogenic  and anthropogenic  sources.  But there is also a growing human-environment interaction that leads to disruptions and disasters at a variety of scales.  While some of the anthropogenic factors depend upon technological advances (e.g., nuclear radiation) other factors are ancient (e.g., the use of fire to clear large areas for agricultural purposes, such as in Ukraine, Indonesia or South America).

Our current world offers a series of profound challenges to humanity.  We are pushing our world towards a tipping point of climate change by our changes to the carbon cycle and use of fossil fuels. The social-political-ethnic-religious theater of rivalries and conflict intensifies as the environmental stage rotates. The biochemical machinery of humans and the biological world is now constantly challenged by exposure to a bewildering array of microbes, chemical, and other disturbance agents—to which, humans and other Earth inhabitants must continually adapt. In all of this, the human-environment relationship is cyclical. Both parts of the relationship manifest change in the other setting up an ever changing dynamic.

The 2017-2018 College of the Environment Think Tank will focus upon how humanity will confront and take measure of the human-environment relationship from diverse perspectives of biochemistry, ecology, socio-political-religious, somatics, art, and embodiment.

Thank you,

2017-18 Think Tank Members

Katja Kolcio, Chair and Professor of Dance
Ishita Mukerji, Professor of Integrative Science and Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
Marguerite Nguyen, Assistant Professor of English and East Asian Studies
Eiko Otake, Menakka and Essel Bailey ’66 Distinguished Visiting Scholar in the College of the Environment
Helen Poulos, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Environment Studies