Cultivating Belonging: The Haitian Revolution and Black Struggles Today! An Interdisciplinary Dialogue 4/7

Friday, April 7th 2017  4:30 p.m.
Russell House

This program will bring together a panel of three scholars from three fields of inquiry to engage in conversation about the Haitian Revolution, (the only successful slave revolution in the history of the West) to assess its complex formations, meanings and gendered representations, as well as its possible implications for Black struggles today. Professors Alex Dupuy (Sociology, Wesleyan), Jeremy M. Glick (English, Hunter College) and Kaiama L. Glover (Africana Studies and French, Barnard) will gather to discuss their specific works, which focus explicitly on the Revolution and its aftermath. The timeliness and timelessness of this conversation could not be more exigent as we contemplate how to best envision new futures with “maximalist” potential when detrimental echoes of the past reverberate in our present.

Panelists:

Alex Dupuy is Professor Emeritus of Sociology at Wesleyan U. He is the author of Haiti in the World Economy: Class, Race, and Underdevelopment Since 1700 (1989); Haiti in the New World Order: The Limits of the Democratic Revolution (1997); The Prophet and Power: Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the International Community, and Haiti (2007); Haiti: From Revolutionary Slaves to Powerless Citizens. Essays on the Politics and Economics of Underdevelopment (2014), and more than three dozen articles in professional journals and anthologies. He is particularly interested in issues of Caribbean political economy and social change. He is a well-known commentator on Haitian affairs.

Jeremy M. Glick is Associate Professor of African Diaspora literature and modern drama at Hunter College, English Department. He is currently working on long-form essays on various topics including Frantz Fanon. His first book, The Black Radical Tragic: Performance, Aesthetics, and the Unfinished Haitian Revolution, is the 2017 recipient of the Nicolás Guillén Outstanding Book Award from the Caribbean Philosophical Association. It was recently reviewed by Slavoj Zizek in the L.A. Review of Books.  His second book project is entitled Coriolanus Against Liberalism/Coriolanus & Pan-Africanist Loss. He is also the Hunter College Chapter Chair of the PSC-CUNY Union. 

Kaiama L. Glover is Associate Professor of French and Africana Studies at Barnard College, Columbia University. She is the author of Haiti Unbound: A Spiralist Challenge to the Postcolonial Canon, first editor of Marie Vieux Chauvet: Paradoxes of the Postcolonial Feminine (Yale French Studies 2016), and translator of Frankétienne’s Ready to Burst (Archipelago Books 2014), Marie Vieux-Chauvet’s Dance on the Volcano (Archipelago Books 2016), and René Dépestre’s Hadriana in All My Dreams (Akashic Books 2017). She has received awards and fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the PEN Foundation, the Mellon Foundation, and the Fulbright Foundation.

Talya Zemach-Bersin (’07): “Educational Utopias and the Making of U.S. Global Power, 1898-1950”

Educational Utopias and the Making of U.S. Global Power, 1898-1950

A lecture by
Talya Zemach-Bersin (’07)
Thursday, March 2
4:15pm ~ Fisk 208

Reception to follow in the commons of the Center for Global Studies

This talk examines the historical contexts and social scientific theories that inspired Americans in the first half of the twentieth century to turn their attention to youth-focused experiments in social engineering. Drawing from archival research that bridges intellectual and cultural history, the history of social science, and U.S. empire studies, this research refocuses the story of America’s rise to power on childhood education schemes.

Talya Zemach-Bersin received her BA American Studies from Wesleyan University in 2007, and her PhD in American Studies from Yale University in 2015. She is currently working on her first monograph, Education and the Making of American Globalism: 1898-1950, which will be published by Harvard University Press. Her research has been supported by the New York University Cold War Dissertation Fellowship, the Council on International Educational Exchange, and the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. She was awarded the Yale University Prize Teaching Fellowship and her dissertation was awarded the Yale University John Addison Porter Prize and the History of Education Society’s Claude A. Eggertsen Dissertation Prize. Zemach-Bersin has published several articles and book chapters on higher education and internationalism. Her writing and research bridges domestic and international histories and focuses on the relationship between U.S. global power and the social sciences.

This event is sponsored by the Center for Global Studies and the American Studies Department.

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Study Break with the 2020 Class Council, Monday @ 7-8:30pm

The 2020 Class Council invites you to join your fellow classmates and Dean Phillips on Monday, December 12, for a Study Break @ Exley Lobby from 7:00- 8:30 pm.

https://www.facebook.com/events/1625928484377465/

Coffee and snacks will be provided.
Meet your Class Council members and fellow classmates to discuss your semester.

coffee

Or you can just grab some snacks and a cup of coffee to go.

“Ukrainian Sheriffs” Screening 12/6 at 7:30pm

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Tuesday, December 6, 7.30pm
Powell Family Cinema
College of Film and the Moving Image
301 Washington terrace

FREE

Ukrainian Sheriffs is a real life story about two local sheriffs and the villagers of a remote village near Crimea, Stara Zburievka. Following the sheriffs on their everyday duties, the story gives us a look beyond the war and the ongoing political events inside the everyday life of the villagers, foregrounding the tension between personal survival and political justice. What was meant to be a film about a few people from the Ukrainian countryside and their everyday struggles and portrays the faith of a whole nation during the turning period in its history.

Here you’ll find trailer of the movie

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u81rnJG6ym4

Following this links you’ll find news about the movie and interview with film-director Roman Bondarchuk:

http://www.screendaily.com/reviews/ukrainian-sheriffs-review/5097445.article?blocktitle=REVIEWS&contentID=40296
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/ukrainian-sheriffs-idfa-review-846198
http://www.filmkommentaren.dk/blog/blogpost/3406

Meet-and-Greet with Professor Royette Tavernier, 12/1, 4:30pm, Judd 113

image001Come learn more about ongoing research on campus! PSI CHI  (Wesleyan’s psychology honor society) is hosting a Professor Meet-and-Greet with Prof. Royette Tavernier.  Prof. Tavernier is a developmental psychologist, whose research program examines the link between sleep and psychosocial adjustment. This is a great way to get to know professors in a more informal space, to ask questions, and to get to know fellow psychology majors and non-psychology majors.

This event is open to all students.  Coffee and donuts will be provided! No need to RSVP. Any questions, please contact any of the Psi Chi officers.

Anthropology and #Blacklivesmatter 11/1

You are invited to the Anthropology department’s panel discussion on Anthropology and #BlackLivesMatter on Tuesday, 11/1! It will be a fantastic event, featuring Black feminist anthropologists Dawn-Elissa Fischer, Bianca Williams, and Wesleyan’s very own Gina Athena Ulysse in a wide-ranging conversation about research, #blacklivesmatter, activism, and decolonizing anthropology.

Tuesday, November 1
4:30-6:00pm, reception to follow
Beckham Hall
facebook event page

Poster 1 Prof U

Bianca C. Williams (Ethnic Studies and Anthropology, University of Colorado at Boulder) researches theories of race and gender within African diasporic communities, particularly the emotional aspects of being “Black” and a “woman” in the U.S. and Jamaica. She is at work finishing an ethnography, The Pursuit of Happiness: Black Women and the Politics of Emotional Transnationalism (under contract with Duke University Press) and an edited volume titled, “’Do You Feel Me?’: Exploring Black American Gender and Sexuality through Feeling and Emotion,” co-authored with Jennifer A. Woodruff. Essays in Transforming Anthropology and Cultural Anthropology explore questions of race and gender in ethnographic research and pedagogical practices. She has also edited two collections of essays on #BlackLivesMatter, one for Cultural Anthropology and one for Savage Minds. She is a member of Black Lives Matter 5280 and the AAA Working Group on Racialized Police Brutality and Extrajudicial Violence.

Dawn-Elissa Fischer  (Africana Studies, San Francisco State University), also known as the “DEF Professor,” is completing two manuscripts: Blackness, Race and Gender Politics in Japanese Hiphop and Methods to Floss, Theories to Flow: Hiphop Research, Aesthetics and Activism. Her work has been published in Doing Race: 21 Essays for the 21st Century, the Journal of Popular Music Studies, Transforming Anthropology, FIRE!!! The Multimedia Journal of Black Studies and The Western Journal of Black Studies. Dr. Fischer has co-produced a short film, Nihon Style, with Bianca White, which documents an annual Hiphop festival and its related organizations in Japan.  Dr. Fischer has participated with numerous international social justice creative arts endeavors, including, but not limited to Hiphop as a transnational social movement. She co-directs the BAHHRS (the Bay Area Hip Hop Research and Scholarship) project with Dave “Davey D” Cook and she is a founding staff member of Dr. Marcyliena Morgan’s Hiphop Archive as well as a co-founder of the National Hip Hop Political Convention.

Gina Athena Ulysse (Anthropology, Wesleyan University). In 2015, Prof. U received Wesleyan’s Binswanger Prize for Excellence in Teaching and the Haitian Studies Association award for Excellence in Scholarship.  A public anthropologist and performance artist, Ulysse’s research integrates her interests in Black diasporic conditions, ethnography, pedadogy, performance and representation. More specifically, her interdisciplinary work explores the continuous impact of history on agency and possibilities of social justice in the present. Her publications include Why Haiti Needs New Narratives: A Post Quake Chronicle (2015) and Downtown Ladies: Informal Commercial Importing, A Haitian Anthropologist and Self-Making in Jamaica (2007), and Because When God is too Busy:Haiti, me & THE WORLD (2016) as well as numerous articles and book chapters. Her performance projects include VooDooDoll, What if Haiti Were a Woman? and Contemplating Absences and Distances. Ulysse guest edited “Caribbean Rasanblaj” (2015) a double issue of e-misférica journal and “Pawol Fanm sou Douz Janvye” (2011) in Meridians journal. An intermittent blogger, she often muses on AfricaIsACountry, Huffington Post, Ms Blog and Tikkun Daily.

Pumpkin Festival at Long Lane Farm 10/8

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The College of the Environment in partnership with Long Lane Farms
hosts the annual Pumpkin Festival on the farm (located at Wadsworth St and Long Lane Farm).

Saturday, October 8, 2016 from NOON to 4pm
(raindate will be on Sunday; same time)

The event is free for all to attend.
There will be tours of the farm, live music, activities and crafts
(ie: face painting, tie dying, letterboxing, paper making, creating fringy scarves from upcycled t-shirts) and much more.

Local vendors like The Board Room, Cinder + Salt and The Yarn Store will be there.
Pumpkins, apples and bake goods will be for sale.
Free veggie burgers and hot apple cider will be provided.
Grab a friend or two and join us!

The annual event is hosted by the College of the Environment, Long Lane Farms, and Bon Appetit

Hope to see you there!